Fort Smith Radiation Oncology, P.A.

Kris L. Gast, M.D.
Page 1 of 49
Next
Open
Poem by Steven Michael Sanders

Mr. Sanders gave us permission to share his poem with you all.  To read more of his poetry go to the website http://lulu.com/spotlight/MichaelSanders33.

 

Malignancy

 

It’s not so much the pain involved

Or the fact that it drives you insane

It’s the questions tormenting your psyche

That you are searching to explain

Some people may think you’ve lost it

As you wonder and doubt the whys

You try to see the beauty of life

While the world around you cries

It always seems to come out of the blue

Fading the brilliance to grey

You tell them all just what it is

But no one knows what to say

You appreciate those who care for you

And don’t doubt the ones who know

But it’s not exactly what you had in mind

To fade your vibrant glow

It’s a difficult road to be positive

But a must if you’re to endure

Trusting in those who have always loved you

Is the path to find the cure

You must follow the pathway before you

No matter how large the stones

And walk along the water’s edge

Knowing you’re not alone

 

Posted In: Uncategorized
Comments No Comments
Open
July Cancer Demystified

Skin, your biggest organ, is the only barrier you have between you and the world we live in. Caring for your skin and keeping it well is vital to your overall health. Protecting your skin from the sun is the number one thing you can do to keep your skin healthy. When outdoors, stay covered up with clothing and wear sunscreen of at least 15 SPF and use a lot of it! Apply sunscreen 30 minutes prior to sun exposure and reapply every 2 hours.  Do not forget to apply sunscreen to your ears, lips, and neck, as 80% of skin cancers occur in these areas.  Also, watch out for reflective light from sand, snow, and bright concrete.  Please do not be fooled by lack of sunlight on a cloudy day; clouds are no barrier for us. Last, try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun’s rays are most damaging. In addition to being aware of the dangers of sun exposure, other steps may be taken to promote healthy skin. Caring for your skin can start as soon as you get out of bed.  Try an ancient exfoliation technique called dry brushing, which can stimulate circulation and remove dead skin cells.  Use a brush with natural fibers and brush your arms and legs using short firm strokes.  Follow this regimen with a cool shower instead of warm because hot water tends to dry and toughen your skin.  Also, use a natural oil-based soap and moisturize after showering.  Other helpful tips to improve your skin health include eating a healthy diet, drinking plenty of water, and avoiding tobacco, caffeine, and alcohol. Furthermore, it’s recommended that adults visit their dermatologist at least once a year for a full body examination, as well as perform regular self-checks to look for new moles, lumps and discoloration of your skin. Best advice–take care of your skin, and it will take care of you.

Posted In: Cancer Demystified by Dr. Kris Gast
Comments No Comments
Open
Ask the Pros- Dr. Kris Gast

Q: What does the term SPF mean?

A: SPF stands for the “Sun Protection Factor.” The SPF rating, mainly a measure of UVB protection, shows how long protection from the sun’s UVB rays lasts with an application.  The higher the SPF, the longer the protection will last.

For example, a sunscreen with an SPF of 15 will delay the onset of a sunburn in a person who would otherwise burn in 10 minutes to burn in 150 minutes. Therefore, an application of a SPF 15 sunscreen would allow a person to stay out in the sun 15 times longer.

However, many sunscreens do not block UVA radiation, which does not cause sunburn but can increase the rate of melanoma. Thus, people using sunscreens may be exposed to high UVA levels without realizing it. For the best protection, the use of broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen is recommended.

 

Q: What does UVA and UVB stand for in regards to sun exposure?

A: UV is short for ultraviolet, part of the sun’s light that is invisible to the human eye. UVA rays are those that penetrate the skin deeply and are responsible for tanning.  Causing skin cells to age, UVA rays give sun worshipers wrinkles.  Exposure to UVA rays in large doses can also cause skin cancer.  However, UVB rays are considered the more “dangerous” of the sun’s rays and are most commonly linked to skin cancer. UVB Rays are the rays you can blame when you get a sunburn. Unlike UVA rays, these rays aren’t always the same strength year round. They are more prevalent in the summer months; however, they are able to reflect off of water or snow.

Q: What kind of skin cancers are there?

 

A: The three major types of skin cancers are squamous cell, basal cell, and melanoma.  Squamous cell skin cancers, making up 20% of all skin cancers, tend to be on areas of sun-exposed skin, such as the face, eyes, lips, arms, and back of hands.  With over 1 million new cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year, basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer in humans.  These cancers grow slowly and usually appear on the face and neck area.  Melanoma derives from special cells in the skin and can occur anywhere on the body.  Caught early, most melanomas can be cured with relatively minor surgery. However, melanoma can be more serious than the other forms of skin cancer, because it may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body and cause serious illness and death.

 

Posted In: Ask the Pros
Comments No Comments
Page 1 of 49
Next
  © 2012 Fort Smith Radiation Oncology, P.A. — All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Old Fort Software, Inc.