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Dr. Kris Gast ~ Ask the Pros

Q: How do you know you have prostate cancer?

 

A: Most men with early stages of prostate cancer are symptom free.  More advanced prostate cancer may cause signs and symptoms such as painful urination or bowel movements, blood in urine or stools, and difficulty urinating or being constipated.  The late symptoms indicating the cancer has spread can include bone pain.  A prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test can detect prostate cancer long before any symptoms might appear.  The recommendation is that men over the age of 50 or men ages 40 to 50 who have a family history of prostate cancer be screened.  On September 19, 2013, Fort Smith Radiation Oncology is offering a free PSA screening from 8am-11:30am and 1pm-3:00pm. Please call 479-648-1800 to receive additional information and to schedule your free screening.

 

Q: Does having a vasectomy increase my risk of prostate cancer?

A: From all the studies I have read, none have shown a link between having a vasectomy and developing prostate cancer.  This thought is just one of the many myths regarding prostate cancer.  Other myths can include the following: prostate cancer treatment always causes impotence, sexual activity increases the risk of prostate cancer, prostate cancer is contagious, and prostate cancer is an “old man’s” disease.  For more information about prostate cancer, please make plans to attend my UAFS Lifelong Learning lecture titled Prostate Cancer: Myths and Reality at UAFS on September 18at 1:00 pm at the Echols Conference center.  Visit the website http://uafs.edu/cll/lifelong-learning-lecture-series to register for the lecture or call 479-648-1800 for more information.

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Dr. Kris Gast ~ Ask the Pros

Q:  Can you give me information about brain tumors?

A: A primary brain tumor actually arises from the brain or spinal cord.  This is not to be confused with a metastatic brain tumor, which is a tumor that has spread from some other part of the body, such as a lung cancer that has spread to the brain.  Brain tumors are classified by cell origin and cell behavior from the least aggressive (benign) to the most aggressive (malignant). Additionally, some tumor types are assigned a grade, ranging from Grade I (least malignant) to Grade IV (most malignant), which signifies the rate of growth.   Accounting for less than 1% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer deaths, more than 120 types of brain and central nervous system (CNS) tumors can occur with about 45,000 cases reported yearly.  However, in pediatric cancers (those found in children) the occurrence rate is 20-25%.

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FSRO Wins Whole Heart Award

Dr. Kris Gast, Kim Vann and Pat Sears

Under the guidance of FSRO, with the help of Morrison Elementary’s other Partners in Education–Ameriprise, First Western Bank, and International Paper—Morrison Elementary held its Relay Recess on May 6 of this year.

Dr. Kris Gast and Fort Smith Radiation Oncology, along with the other partners, received a reward for their hard work as the winners of the Whole Heart Award at the annual end-of-school Partners in Education luncheon held May 30.

 

Posted In: Community Involvement, Relay for Life, Uncategorized
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